About

This is a blog about child development, education, social issues relating to children, parenting, and everything in between.

I began this blog several years ago when I was pursuing a bachelor’s degree in child development and teaching preschool in a state-funded program in southern California. I was on fire with all that I was learning and experiencing with children and families on a daily basis, as well as impassioned by my studies. I wanted to share the connections that I was excitedly making between brain development and my classroom observations. At the time, it seemed like the formula for fostering meaningful success in young children and families was right there, so close, if only people would take the time to understand (turn off the TV; read to your children; stop feeding them junk; be consistent…).

Since that time, I left my position at that preschool and started working with infants, toddlers, and their families. I learn more every day and still regularly become impassioned by new issues. Most of all, I’m continually dazzled by the children and need an outlet for my stories.

I believe that I have one of the best jobs in the entire world. It is challenging, enriching, diverse, and engaging. It’s important work that I do each day — a point that I remind myself of regularly. Because even when the world outside seeks to demean its value or depth, I know that my time with the infants and toddlers in my care is of the utmost importance to them as individuals, to them as a small community, and to their families. Select adults will consider my work to be that of a Professional Diaper-Changer or Glorified Babysitter, but I know better and perhaps you know better too.

Magda Gerber, who gently influences the philosophy of the program I help to build, once said, “I would like to make the people who work with infants the most honorable and best paid—not overpaid, because it shouldn’t be done by people who do it only for the money.   Educaring should be done by very capable people who also make a decent living.  That is what I would wish for the future.

“We can make it happen.  It won’t happen in weeks or even in months.  The politicians will not make it happen.  WE have to do it.  We have to do it.  We have to present ourselves like professional people who do a most important job, which we do.  Slowly, not in my time but in yours, this may have results.  Keep fighting for it.”

This blog is one way in which I fight for it.

You can follow me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/educarer and Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/EducatingHeart as I experiment with this phenomena known as social networking!

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